North Coast Partners

Regional partners along the California North Coast.  Angelo researchers are grateful for local and regional partners who share our interests of understanding the past, current, and future states of watersheds along the North Coast watersheds.  Like some of our partners but not others, Angelo researchers do not take advocacy positions.  We want to become well-informed about societal and environmental concerns along the North Coast in order to help shed light on the consequences of various choices or policies for the environment.

Eel River Recovery Project www.eelriverrecovery.org

In 2011, Eel River citizens  concerned about diminishing flows, recovery of salmonids, and recent toxic algal blooms in the Eel River formed the Eel River Recovery Project (ERRP), with Patrick Higgins as its Volunteer Coordinator.  Keith Bouma-Gregson, studying cyanobacteria for his dissertation at Berkeley, reached out to ERRP, starting a wonderful partnership.

Hiromi organizes an aquatic insect display for Water Day

Hiromi organizes an aquatic insect display for Water Day 2014, at the Mateel Center in Humboldt Co.

Angelo researchers have benefited from (and assisted with) ERRP’s extensive monitoring of temperature, channel condition, and fish, which ERRP volunteers have freely shared with their partners.  Angelo Reseachers, particularly Keith Bouma-Gregson, have participated in ERRP events in

Next Gen Eel River Aquatic Entomologist

Next Gen Eel River Aquatic Entomologist

Angelinos who ran a demonstration table for ERRP's 2014 Water Day: right to left: Cody Schaaf, Suzanne Kelson, Larissa Walder, Phil Georgakakos, Hiromi Uno, Keith Bouma-Gregson

Angelinos who ran a demonstration table for ERRP’s 2014 Water Day: right to left: Cody Schaaf, Suzanne Kelson, Larissa Walder, Phil Georgakakos, Hiromi Uno, Keith Bouma-Gregson

 

 

 

 

Humboldt and Mendocino counties.  Keith Bouma-Gregson has given educational talks for ERRP events about cyanobacteria and algae in the Eel, June22_Tooby 026and ERRP in turn has been represented by great participants in our biennial Algal Forays at Angelo, in which we train interested citizens and students to identify algae, distinguishing “the good, the bad, and the structural”.  links to Keith’s presentations

 

 

 

 

 

Keith training ERRP algal volunteer in simple quantitative algal monitoring transect method

Keith training ERRP algal volunteer in simple quantitative algal monitoring transect method

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karuk Tribe (http://www.karuk.us)

Ron Reed of the Karuk Tribe

Ron Reed, a Karuk dip net fisher and youth leader, on Middle Klamath River near the Ti Bar tributary, his family’s ancestral home, explaining plans for nursery habitat for coho by restoring tributaries. Photo by M. Power.

We are very grateful for our exchanges and friendship with members of the Karuk Tribe, the “Fix the Earth” people.  Karuk live on their ancestral lands along the middle Klamath River, an amazingly beautiful, diverse, and rugged landscape.  The Karuk-Berkeley Collaborative, founded in 2008, has provided many opportunities for Berkeley students and researchers to visit Karuk restoration projects in their ancestral lands, and for us to benefit from their visits to our study sites. Our Karuk friends and

Bill and Karuk

Bill Dietrich explains studies at the Rivendell watershed to Karuk tribal members Bill Tripp and Ron Reed and Tom Carlson, IB faculty at Berkeley and a charter member of the Karuk-Berkeley Collaborative.

bbq lamprey 1

JayJay Reed barbecues lamprey for Ecosystems class and family and friends.

colleagues have helped us understand how tending by Native Californians structured and sustained rivers and forests of the North Coast.  Karuk friends, along with Tom Carlson and Jenny Sowerwine, have hosted Karuk visit 2008 IB 157wonderful field trips for the Ecosystems of California class, and Karuk friends and leaders have visited our Angelo sites.  We look forward to more scientific and educational collaboration with Karuk friends, scientists and youth over the years to come.

 

Berkeley students and faculty are already very actively engaged with

Bill Tripp explaining Karuk forest thinning practices to Berkeley students

Bill Tripp explaining Karuk forest thinning practices to Berkeley students.  photo by M. Power

Karuk tribal members through the The mission of the Karuk-UC Berkeley Collaborative (http://nature.berkeley.edu/karuk-collaborative) is “to foster synergistic collaborations between the Karuk Tribe and UC Berkeley, and additional partners working with them, to enhance the eco-cultural revitalization of the people and landscapes within Karuk ancestral lands. Initiatives include Ron Reed, springfacilitating UC Berkeley-Karuk scientific collaborations, helping to facilitate tribal youth leadership in science, and helping to design and conduct studies related to traditional land and cultural resource management.”  We are excited to develop these collaborations.

Redwood Forest Foundation, Inc.  http://www.rffi.org.  “RFFI is a non-profit organization of stakeholders, including loggers, environmentalists, community activists, foresters and others, working together to conserve forest lands and to protect biodiversity, mitigate climate change and improve the local economy in an equitable fashion.” -from the RFFI web site.

Angelo researchers are inspired by the vision of this community-based

Fog makes RFFI lands promising for redwood forestry.

Fog makes RFFI lands promising for redwood forestry.

forestry group, and applaud their efforts to rehabilitate 50,000 acres of

Art and Judy Harwood host barbecue for RFFI meeting in their Usal Forest meeting.

Art and Judy Harwood host barbecue for RFFI meeting in their Usal Forest meeting.

industrially logged redwood forest in the steep Usal basins along the South Fork Eel River, north of the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in Mendocino Co.  We admire RFFI’s goal of rehabilitating salmon-bearing rivers and recovering sustainably harvested redwood forests, sustaining both native species and human livelihoods along the North Coast.

Angelo researchers partnered with RFFI in a presentation at an Ecological Society of America Millenium Conference on Water and Social Justice  (link to RFFI poster loaded into media link to poster).  We  have also joined them for discussions on their plans for a new environmental education center near Piercy, and on potential restoration of channels on their lands near the

Right to left--Bill Dietrich, Dorothy Merritts, Bob Walter, and RFFI Forest Manager in alder grove near the mouth of the Usal River, discussing restoration options. Equisetum (horse tail) indicates proximity of water table in this shaded swampy meadow.

Right to left–Bill Dietrich, Dorothy Merritts, Bob Walter, and RFFI Forest Manager in alder grove near the mouth of the Usal River, discussing restoration options. Equisetum (horse tail) indicates proximity of water table in this shaded swampy meadow.

confluence of the North and South Fork Usal,  At this site, RFFI is addressing the problem of logging legacies that triggered a landslide into the North Fork Usal channel.  The sediment piled up in the channel, blocking summer passage for salmonids, leaving fish to die of heat shortly before the final reach that could convey them to the sea.  One restoration hypothesis would

Mature alder grove just above blocked reach of the low-flow Usal, where, if historic anabranching swales were dug below water table, out-migrating salmonids might be able to wait in cool water for the onset of the winter floods to convey them out to sea.

Mature alder grove just above blocked reach of the low-flow Usal, where, if historic anabranching swales were dug below water table, out-migrating salmonids might be able to wait in cool water for the onset of the winter floods to convey them out to sea. Photo by M. Power.

be that digging out old anabranching channels–now filled with legacy sediments but still damply apparent, in a wetland shaded by mature alder canopy–could create cool “over-summering habitat” for maturing fish, allowing them to survive until winter floods escort them out of the river into the sea.  This is one of several restoration ideas that RFFI and their partners are considering for their site.

Friends of the Eel River, FOER

links to Sarah Kupferberg, Mary Power, and Bill Dietrich presentations at Fortuna, 2011

Angelinos have learned a lot about the Eel and the Russian Rivers from field trips, presentations, and interactions with:

 

Karuk & RFFI
NCED and HydroWatch scientists collaborate with two citizen groups in northern California seeking to restore and manage forests in a way that increases their ecological resilience and their sustained value for local communities. One partner is the Karuk Tribe, whose ancestral forest practices and current restoration efforts may improve hydrologic cycles, river flows and temperatures for salmonids in the Middle Klamath Basin.

The other partner is Redwood Forest Foundation, Inc. (RFFI), a community based forestry association seeking to rehabilitate 50,000 acres of industrially logged redwood forest in the steep Usal basins along the South Fork Eel River, just north of the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in Mendocino Co. All partners are seeking ways to make forests more resilient to climate change, improve salmon bearing rivers and increase the productivity of redwood forests, so that these iconic North Coast ecosystems sustain both native species and, where harvested, livelihoods for local human communities.

Usal Forest

View from Usal towards the North Coast, with hopeful rainbow.

Web sites
Eel River Recovery Project

Redwood Forest Foundation, Inc.
Karuk Tribe
University Partners

Berkeley Initiative in Global Change Biology (BIGCB)

University of California Natural Reserve System