Who uses Angelo

Second and third generation Angelo Reserve Researchers at Fox Creek Lodge, looking towards Wilderness Lodge Meadow

Second and third generation Angelo Reserve Researchers at Fox Creek Lodge, looking towards Wilderness Lodge Meadow

The Angelo Reserve, like other reserves within the UC Natural Reserve System, is dedicated to university-level research, teaching, and public outreach.  These purposes draw a variety of people and organizations to Angelo, researchers, both individuals and scientific teams, members of the public concerned with regional environmental issues, K-12 to university classes, and naturalists and day hikers.

Researchers

High school students, undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and agency and NGO scientists all carry out research at Angelo.  Presently, four members of the National Academy of Sciences work with their students and colleagues at the Reserve.  Many researchers are long-term ‘Angelinos’ (including faculty who did their dissertations here, and are now bringing Angelo ‘grand-students’ back for more field research).

In October 2013, with support from the Berkeley Vice Chancellor for Research Graham Fleming and his staff (thanks, Verna Bowie!), Bill Dietrich organized eight Berkeley colleagues (from four different departments on the campus) to brainstorm about our common interests in water, climate, soils and rocks, trees, river ecology, and their interactions under global change.  Our successful proposal to the National Science Foundation allowed us to establish the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory, which will deepen and extend foundational work done during the NCED and Keck programs to investigate “what lies beneathe” hillslopes and forests of the California Coast Range, and how processes and interactions hidden in this “critical zone” will both respond to changes in climate, biota, and land use, and influence them over the coming decades.

December 2013 meeting of the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory science team. From left to right: Jim Bishop, geochemist; Jill Banfield, geomicrobiologist; Mary Firestone, soil microbiologist; Stephanie Carlson, fish ecologist; Todd Dawson, tree ecophysiologist; Verna Bowie, VCR project analyst; Sally Thompson, ecohydrologist; Inez Fung, climate scientist; Mary Power, food web ecologist; Bill Dietrich, geomorphologist, hydrologist, and ERCZO Director

December 2013 meeting of the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory science team. From left to right: Jim Bishop, geochemist; Jill Banfield, geomicrobiologist; Mary Firestone, soil microbiologist; Stephanie Carlson, fish ecologist; Todd Dawson, tree ecophysiologist; Verna Bowie, VCR project analyst; Sally Thompson, ecohydrologist; Inez Fung, climate scientist; Mary Power, food web ecologist; Bill Dietrich, geomorphologist, hydrologist, and ERCZO Director

Keck Team-revised

The Keck Hydrowatch team intensively instrumented a tiny drainage on the north-facing slope of Elder Creek to learn how water cycles from the atmosphere through tall trees into underlying bedrock, to be drawn back up again by trees, or to be released as stream flow. Inez Fung, atmospheric scientist and PI, lower right; Todd Dawson, tree ecophysiologist, upper right, Bill Dietrich, geomorphologist-hydrologist, lower center, team on steep slope, bottom left, Grandfather Oak, upper left.

 

Mathematicians, engineers, Earth Scientists and ecologists plan research at Angelo, the first collaborative field station for the National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics

Mathematicians, engineers, Earth scientists and ecologists plan research at Angelo, the first collaborative field site for the Center for Earth Surface Dynamics, an NSF Science and Technology Center (2002-20012)

 

“Eyes on the Eel” is an ongoing survey of the state of river and tributary ecosystems along Eel mainstems and tributaries, one of four long term research tasks outlined for the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory.  This effort is led by Profs Stephanie Carlson and Mary Power, and graduate students Suzanne Kelson, Phil Georgakakos, and Keith Bouma-Gregson.  Our Berkeley-based student crews have been, frankly, amazing at putting up with long days, hard work, wet clothes, while steadfastly documenting physical conditions, algal abundances, invertebrates, and vertebrates along 48 transects crossing four tributaries and four mainstem sites down the South Fork and mainstem Eel River.  Thanks so much to these field researchers, and to the many generous land owners who have given us permission to visit their property for surveys.

September 2015 Eyes on the Eel Crew in Wilderness Lodge meadow

September 2015 Eyes on the Eel Crew in Wilderness Lodge meadow

Student Researchers

High school and undergraduate students who are interested in carrying out their own research, or in getting their feet wet by assisting graduate students, postdocs, or faculty with their projects, should contact individuals with whom they would like to work.  We welcome students who are committed to field science, considerate of others and of the environment, and comfortable in rustic field conditions.   See our Research and Angelo Alums section for cool projects done at Angelo by undergraduate researchers.  There are several campus programs that fund summer research for Berkeley undergraduates.

 

Classes

K-12, college, and universities have all made use of the Angelo Reserve for environmental education and more focused courses.  See “Visiting” to learn how to make reservations.

Every 2 years since 2007, we have hosted neighbors, students, and other researchers interested in learning from Algal Experts Rex Lowe and Paula Furey to appreciate the beauty and fascination of the algae of the Eel River, a topic of particular interest now as algal dominance and ecological roles change under the stress of our current drought.  See “News” for our plans for the 2015 Algal Foray, June 12-14 2015.

Algal Foray 2007--Rex Lowe and Paula Furey instruct a motley group of university students and faculty, Eel River Recovery Project, and tribal and private sector scientists concerned with the Eel and Klamath Rivers in recognizing "The Good, The Bad, and the Other" algae

Algal Foray 2013–Rex Lowe and Paula Furey instruct a motley group of university students and faculty, Eel River Recovery Project, and tribal and private sector scientists concerned with the Eel and Klamath Rivers in recognizing “The Good, The Bad, and the Other” algae

2013 Algal Foray class under the Grandfather Oak at the Elder Creek waterfalls. Photo by Mike Limm.

2013 Algal Foray class under the Grandfather Oak at the Elder Creek waterfalls. Photo by Mike Limm.

Ecosystem of California class on porch of the Fox Creek Pavillion picture

Ecosystem of California class on porch of the Fox Creek Pavillion picture

Blake Suttle shows class consequences of his 15-year climate manipulation of South Meadow for Angelo grasses, wildflowers, and meadow invertebrates

Blake Suttle shows class consequences of his 15-year climate manipulation of South Meadow for Angelo grasses, wildflowers, and meadow invertebrates

Prof. Meredith Thomsen of Univ. of Wisconsin, LaCrosse, is a former Berkeley Ph.D. and Angelo researcher who has partnered with Blake Suttle on a fifteen year experiment examining how different seasonal timings of precipitation affect native and exotic grasses and meadow food webs at Angelo.  She and her colleague Tim Gerber have brought several environmental sciences students to study field biology at Angelo (http://news.uwlax.edu/climate-change-research-is-a-resource-for-k-12-classrooms/).

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Meredith Thomsen teaches LaCrosse students techniques for quantifying vegetation changes under altered rainfall. Photo by Tim Herber.

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They collect plants quantitatively

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Let the sorting begin! In the lab, not under the Sorting Hat this time.

 

Meredith Thomsen's Univ. Wisconsin-La Crosse class investigates lower reach of Skunk Creek

Meredith Thomsen’s Univ. Wisconsin-La Crosse class investigates lower reach of Skunk Creek