The Heath and Marjorie Angelo Coast Range Reserve protects 7,660 acres of the upper watershed of South Fork of the Eel River in Mendocino County for university-level teaching and research. The Angelo Coast Range Reserve was the first gift to The Nature Conservancy west of the Mississippi, and for many years, the largest (see site history). Today, it is one of 39 protected natural areas  in the University of California Natural Reserve System, and is managed through the U.C. Berkeley campus.

Since Heath and Marjorie Angelo protected their land in the 1930s, the population of California has increased over six-fold.  The Angelo gift, along with the 17 sq. km Elder Creek basin (designated as an area of critical ecological concern by the Bureau of Land Management)  together constitute one of the largest continuous tracts of undeveloped coastal conifer forest remaining in California. The reserve protects 5 km of the upper South Fork Eel River, four undisturbed tributary watersheds, mixed conifer broad-leaf forests, meadows on river terraces, and bands of chaparral at higher elevations.

The Angelo Reserve hosts several hundred visitors (faculty, researchers, students and citizens) each year, as well as classes, meetings and workshops. Between 1960-2017, research in the Reserve has produced more than 290 publications and 30 PhD dissertations or Master’s theses.  6 videos have been made about Angelo research- see video documentary links below. It is the main field observatory for two NSF Centers and for the Keck Hydrowatch Program.  Angelo currently hosts the NSF Eel River Critical Zone Observatory. Research facilities include laboratories at Goldman Environmental Science Center, rustic housing for ~ 40 persons, a small watershed that is intensely instrumented for hydrology, and a wireless backbone for a sensor and communications network. 

Angelo Reserve is located in the Eel River Watershed which spans 3 counties in coastal northern California.

Recent Posts

Recent paper by Rempe and Dietrich on rock moisture featured by NSF, SF Chronicle

Daniella Rempe and Bill Dietrich’s recent paper, “Direct observations of rock moisture, a hidden component of the hydrologic cycle” is receiving press on the NSF News website, the San Francisco Chronicle, ScienceDaily, and other news organizations. Their study, conducted at the Eel River CZO, monitored rock moisture from 2013-2016 at nine wells across a hillslope underlain by a thick weathered bedrock zone. They found that this bedrock can be a water source for trees even after the soil has become parched during the dry season, suggesting that rock moisture should be incorporated into hydrologic and land-surface models used to predict regional and global climate.

See more press on this study at the links below:

https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=244513

https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/Study-finds-rock-moisture-spared-California-12710035.php

http://criticalzone.org/eel/news/story/recent-paper-by-rempe-and-dietrich-on-rock-moisture-featured-by-nsf-and-oth/

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/trees-hidden-rock-water-drought-survival

https://news.utexas.edu/2018/02/26/hidden-rock-moisture-could-explain-forest-surviving-drough

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180226181606.htm

 

  1. Congratulations to the Baird Awardees! Comments Off on Congratulations to the Baird Awardees!
  2. Pamphlet on Lyme Disease in California Comments Off on Pamphlet on Lyme Disease in California
  3. Carol Baird Graduate Student Award for Field Research Comments Off on Carol Baird Graduate Student Award for Field Research
  4. Research at Angelo- Dr. Sarah Kupferberg Comments Off on Research at Angelo- Dr. Sarah Kupferberg
  5. The Willits Hub Fish & Aquatics Restoration Day Comments Off on The Willits Hub Fish & Aquatics Restoration Day
  6. Mary Power and Gabe Rossi, and the stalwart student teams doing Eyes on the Eel surveys: The Movie. Comments Off on Mary Power and Gabe Rossi, and the stalwart student teams doing Eyes on the Eel surveys: The Movie.
  7. Listening to the forest breathe: monitoring tree trunk sap flow and size Comments Off on Listening to the forest breathe: monitoring tree trunk sap flow and size
  8. Prof. Mary Power Speaks at USGS Pacific Regional Colloquium Comments Off on Prof. Mary Power Speaks at USGS Pacific Regional Colloquium
  9. Angelo and Eel River CZO on local radio Comments Off on Angelo and Eel River CZO on local radio